Out with the tide…

Lazy afternoon

…or you’re done for the day.

Above, Havelock fishermen empty their boats for the afternoon; they’ll return to the sea at night or the next morning when the fish are more active and the tide is high enough for them to clear the coral-strewn flats.

Perhaps I’m romanticizing just a little, but these are the opposite of industrial fishing. They’re traditional fisherfolk who have been sustaining their families on small catches for generations.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Bamboo!

As I continue to build my statistical model of India’s forests and potential drivers of deforestation, I can’t help but be enamored by bamboo. I need land and I need to plant.

(This bamboo comes from an old growth stand in Madagascar when I was there in 2009. The photo doesn’t do justice to the monstrous size of this thicket. The creaking in the breeze was unnerving.)

Tags: , , , , ,

Lost photo: Longing for emerald islands

Andamans on my mind


Not sure I ever posted this shot.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Oh to see the beach

Havelock No. 3

Dreaming of Havelock… But in a few weeks, I’ll at least be on sandy shores in Panama.

Tags: , , , , ,

Back to the start

So right, in so many ways.

That this aired in primetime during the Grammy Awards is a powerful statement. I don’t want to see corporate American brand sustainable, simple living as something of its own (hell, I’ve come late to the party). But my heart is warmed over at the thought of such ethics in the mainstream.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

I want to hang out with fishermen

My people

I spend a lot of time thinking about small-scale fishermen. I do not spend enough time actually hanging out with small-scale fishermen.

Like these guys, whose boat is beached for the afternoon in the tide flats of Havelock.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Lonely tree

I wish I could be there with her

I love this beach. I love her. I want them together.

Tags: , , , ,

I’m writing to you, Senator #nokxl

Senator Durbin:

This is not a form letter. You and I have shaken hands plenty; for a while we were on a first-name basis when I was a political reporter at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. How many times did I tour the Metro East with you? How many times was I there at town hall meetings in the Collinsville City Council chambers or Edwardsville or Granite City?

Today, I am in graduate school here in D.C. studying environmental policy. I’m an activist. I was arrested for protesting in front of the White House in September. I’m a scholar. I research natural resource policy, environmental degradation and sustainable development.

I’m asking you as a professional acquaintance, as someone who listened for a long time to the political concerns of southern Illinoisans, as a worried citizen and as a registered Illinois voter (my permanent address is in Champaign) to do all you can to stop GOP factions and Big Oil special interests from resurrecting the Keystone XL pipeline.

If you and your allies in the Senate take the time to talk straight to Americans (whatever the hell Fox News thinks), they will listen. If you take a moral stand, you’ll be doing the right thing (whatever the hell the Tea Party thinks).

And if you need help that I can provide, contact me.

There’s so much more we could be doing to invigorate our economy and protect this planet. Think about green jobs in a renewable energy economy. Think solar and offshore wind and green infrastructure. Think better quality of living and public health. Think natural splendor that warms heart and soul.

But if we instead take the cheap (actually more costly) and dirty (yes, really, really dirty) way of burning tar sands, we become that much more path dependent on oil. That’s game over for our planet.

I’ve heard you tell me directly about how Washington needs change, how it’s beholden to special interests, how our government needs bold action.

I say to you, lead the charge.

Adam Jadhav

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Jangal hei

Jangal = jungle

After net gains for several years, India’s forest cover is in decline. The full data is available now from the Forest Survey of India in its newly released State of the Forest Report 2011.

The government writes off any major backsliding, saying the reduction is due to shifting cultivation patterns in the rural northeast, plantation harvesting and Naxal rebels cutting trees. That last one is a dubious.

More likely, there are many factors at play in a complex dynamic that varies state by state. I’m in the process of designing a statistical research project looking for explanation among a number of variables, biological, economic, political and social.

The photo above comes from tropical forest in the Andaman Islands.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

What’s the name of this fish again?

North Indian anemonefish

Also, I believe, properly known as a Clark’s Anemonefish. Like all species, identification is difficult because people everywhere call them by different common names.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,